GCOOS is creating a new hub to gather and share information about ocean acidification in the Gulf of Mexico: G-CAN, the GCOOS Coastal Ocean Acidification Network. The goal is to identify vulnerabilities in the Gulf ecosystem that may be impacted by OA, foster collaborations to increase ocean observations and develop strategies to help mitigate impacts.

The network is a collaboration between GCOOS and NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program and includes federal and state agency representatives, resource managers, industry partners and research scientists.

The G-CAN steering committee met in early December and began laying out focus areas and GCOOS has created several webpages focused on ocean acidification and its effects.  The pages — which are live but still under development — include research findings and journal articles, links to resources, information about OA studies and more.

  • G-CAN will also be hosting a series of webinars on OA issues. The first webinar — “Ocean Acidification of the Pelagic Gulf of Mexico” — will be presented at 1 p.m. EST on Tuesday, Jan. 24, by Drs. Richard H. (Rik) Wanninkhof & Leticia Barbero.

 

The location of sentinel sites to monitor ocean acidification and subsequent ecosystem impacts that have been established in the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA image

The location of sentinel sites to monitor ocean acidification and subsequent ecosystem impacts that have been established in the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA image

About the presenters:

  • Rik Wanninkhof is a senior scientist at the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory of NOAA in Miami, Fla. He studies the oceanic inorganic carbon cycle with focus of the anthropogenic perturbation thereof and has done extensive research on the transfer of carbon dioxide across the air-water interface. He is involved in several sustained observation programs including surface water CO2 measurements from ships of opportunity (SOOP-CO2), repeat hydrography of ocean interior measurements (GO-SHIP) and coastal ocean acidification monitoring in the Gulf of Mexico and East Coast. He is co-chair of the global ocean ship-based hydrographic investigation panel (GO-SHIP) and member of the executive committee of the international ocean carbon coordination project (IOCCP).
  • Leticia Barbero is an assistant scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) from the University of Miami and conducts her work at the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) of NOAA. Her area of expertise is the CO2 system in the ocean. She has worked with CO2 data from dedicated cruises, ships of opportunity and drifters in the Atlantic Ocean, Southern Ocean and coastal regions of the U.S. Her current research focus is on air-sea fluxes of CO2, ocean acidification (OA) in coastal waters and anthropogenic contribution to changes in aragonite saturation states. She has participated and led several cruises aimed at studying OA conditions in coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico and eastern coast of the U.S.
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  • Register for the webinar